"On the Come Up" - December Edition
ASCAP "We Create Music"
THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND PUBLISHERS
ACE / Repertory Find Titles, Writers & Publishers and more Find Titles, Writers, Publishers and more
Search ASCAP.com
 
Search ASCAP.com
December 28, 2012

"On the Come Up" - December Edition

King Chip

King Chip

Artist King Chip opens up to "On the Come Up" about who he is.


What was your first introduction to the music industry?

KC: It's hard to say, but the first time I heard rap music by Will Smith on Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, I was like, "Oh, I gotta do that."

How did you get the opportunity to work with Kid Cudi on "Just What I Am?" How was your experience working with him?

KC: Cudi is my guy. I'm on his first two albums and a mixtape of his. That's my dawg. I was in the studio, and he was like, "I need you on this." And the rest is pretty much history.

What are you currently working on?

KC: I'm currently working on a mixtape and an album. It won't be a mixtape, actually, but what I call a "collection." For two months, every two weeks, I'll release five records. The mixtape is worn down, anybody and everybody is doing it. [My collection] going to be groundbreaking.

What differentiates you from other artists?

KC: I think what distinguishes me is my language arts, just me as a person. Your artistry comes from your personality. You can only be as good of an artist as you are as a person. [My music] is clearly cultured.

What inspires you to create music?

KC: Good times. I don't really make angry music or music when I'm sad. When I'm down, I like silence. I'll just have a car ride with no music. I only make music when I'm upbeat. Positive vibes inspire my music.

Who is your musical mentor and why?

KC: My musical mentor is Mark "Hawk" McCord. He died November 9th, 2011. He's from my neighborhood. He died at the age of 33. I just learned a lot from him. He went through so much. Eight years before his death, he was shot and he was paralyzed from the waist down. He died in a wheelchair, and he didn't want any pity. He made the dopest rhymes in the hood. Everything that he said to me was gold. He would tell me to go in the house at 10 pm because there was nothing outside for me at that time. Everything he taught me, I try to share it with people.

What advice do you have for up-and-coming artists?

KC: I would say it's all about the music and lifestyle. The music's got to be good. I can only adapt to and be drawn to people who have something that I can take from. You got to make people wonder about what you are doing right now. Think twice before you want to hop in the [music industry] lane because you want to rap. Your life has to fit. 50 Cent is a great artist, but whose to say he would have been a great artist if he hadn't been shot nine times and if everybody didn't know it.

For more information on King Chip, follow him on Twitter at @Chip216.




Luney Tunez

Luney Tunez

Producer Luney Tunez makes "On the Come Up" fall in love with his musical style.


What was your first introduction to the music industry?

LT: My first introduction to the music industry was just going out to these open mics in Atlanta and just being open to the Atlanta music scene - and just music in general.

What differentiates you from other producers?

LT: I would say my 808s. Everybody loves that Luney 808. Also, I would say my melodies. The way I put together a track isn't like anyone else. People who know my sound know right away, that's a Luney beat.

What are you currently working on?

LT: Right now, my latest production is that "Loveeeeeee Song" by Rihanna featuring Future. I also produced "Go Harder" and "Rider" for Future. I'm working with everybody right now, just making my rounds in the industry.

How did you get the opportunity to work with Rihanna on "Loveeeeeee Song?" How was your experience working with her?

LT: It was cool. What was so funny was me and my boy, Mex Manny, made the beat together working in the studio with Future. He [Future] was saying that he was looking for some R&B joints for Rihanna. He sent it to Rihanna and the rest is just history.

What inspires you to create music?

LT: My family, they believe in me, and my fans. I got a lot of people rooting for me. Also, me as a person. I just get inspired by the way music makes people feel.

Who is your musical mentor and why?

LT: My musical mentor is L.A. Reid. He is the man. I can't wait to meet him. "Go Harder" by Future is one of his favorite tracks. He is definitely a music mogul and I'm making my way to that status.

What advice do you have for up-and-coming producers?

LT: My advice to up-and-coming producers is if you're trying to get in this game, make sure your 808s and melodies are hitting right. You've got to grind and make sure your music is sounding right. Make sure that this is definitely something you want to do. This doesn't come easy, only the strong survive.

For more information on Luney Tunez, follow him on Twitter/Instagram at @luneytunezbj.




Young Chop

Young Chop

Producer, Young Chop, chats with "On the Come Up" about slicing up the competition.


Where are you originally from?

Young Chop: Chicago, IL.

What was your first introduction to the music industry?

YC: I was 11 years old. I wanted to rap at first, and my cousin introduced me to FL Studios.

What differentiates you from other producers?

YC: I'm just different. I just go in the studio with a different mindset. I want to make something that nobody else is doing.

What are you currently working on?

YC: I'm currently working on Wale's project, different stuff for French Montana, and working with my artists with 8TMG.

What inspires you to create music?

YC: It's just in my blood. I just love to do it.

Who is your musical mentor and why?

YC: I never had one. I was my own mentor.

What advice do you have for up-and-coming producers?

YC: Work hard, grind. Get the right lawyer, management...everything got to be right.

For more information on Young Chop, follow him on Twitter at @youngchopbeatz.