"On the Come Up" - October Edition
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November 13, 2012

"On the Come Up" - October Edition

C4

C4

Songwriter and producer C4 talks to "On the Come Up" about breathing life into the music industry.


Where are you originally from?

C4: I was born in Atlanta, GA and raised in Stone Mountain, GA.

What was your first introduction to the music industry?

C: I started as an intern at Music House Studios in Atlanta. While working there, I was able to see the entire creative process - how songs were created from start to finish. Between cleaning toilets and doing food runs, I would peek in the studio and see some of my icons producing and writing songs. One day in particular, I remember seeing producer Bryan Michael-Cox. He was playing the keyboards and I walked in the studio and sat down. He continued to play and then he looked up. It was that awkward moment when I knew I had crossed the line and I didn't quite know how to get back across to the other side. However, I still managed to give him a beat CD, praying that he would still consider listening. Unfortunately, nothing came of that. Later that year, one of the studio managers was working with India.Arie and Musiq Soulchild. I would always play him my beats. Musiq was interested in what would become "Radio," which was my first placement and title track on his fifth album, On My Radio.

How did you get the opportunity to work with Tank on "Next Breath?" How was your experience working with him?

C: I got the opportunity to work with Tank through a mutual friend, Kevin McCall. Kevin invited me to the Atlantic Records studio in Hollywood, and when I got there I played him three track ideas. When he heard one of the three, he instantly came up with the chorus line. "I don't think I've ever…ever really told you…how much I need you...girl I need you more… than the next breath I breathe." He played it for Tank a few weeks later, and the rest is history. Tank is a veteran in the music game. He knows exactly what he wants in the studio, so working with him was seamless. I learned a lot.

What are you currently working on?

C: I recently produced "Simply Amazing" and "Almost Lose It" on Trey Songz' latest album, Chapter V. Before that, I did "Keep It Between Us" for Kelly Rowland (Here I Am album). I'm currently working with Canadian singer-songwriter Fefe Dobson; Nickelodeon star Leon Thomas from the show Victorious, and Universal/MoTown's flagship artist Kevin Ross.

What inspires you to compose music?

C: Life inspires me to create. The world around us affects us each day. And that's where I draw my inspiration.

Who is your musical mentor and why?

C: My manager Ted Winn. So many people have impacted my music and have given me advice, however, I would have to say Ted has been the most influential. He was the first person to sit me down and explain the business of music and how to create and balance between the music and the business.

What advice do you have for up-and-coming songwriters and producers?

C: The first and most important piece of advice for inspiring songwriters and producers would be for them to continue to perfect their craft. Each day is an opportunity to get better at what you do. The second thing would be to develop relationships in your community with other writers and producers. Relationships mean everything and opportunities begin to develop once people get to know your abilities.

For more information on C4, follow him on Twitter at @c4musiconline.




Kinf L

King L

Songwriter King L shows "On the Come Up" why he's next in line for Hip Hop's throne.


Where are you originally from?

King L: I was born on the west side of Chicago and I later migrated to the east side of Chicago.

What was your first introduction to the music industry?

KL: My first introduction to the music industry probably would be [my single] "Too Cool" with 2 Chainz and Red Café on the feature.

What differentiates you from other artists?

KL: My style and my voice.

What are you currently working on?

KL: Currently, I'm working on my upcoming mixtape, Drilluminati.

What inspires you to create music?

KL: Good music inspires me to make good music. I like how it makes me feel, the mind frame it puts me in. I want to do the same thing [for my listeners]. And my daughter [also inspires me].

Who is your musical mentor and why?

KL: Honestly, my musical mentor right now is Rick Ross. I like how he puts out his mixtapes. They're not mixtapes with a bunch of freestyles. They're actually songs. His music just sounds crisp. Like, you think his mixtape is an album. To me, he has the best visuals in the game at this moment.

What advice do you have for up-and-coming artists?

KL: Just grind; keep going hard. Have faith in yourself. Stay true; don't be a liar. The truth always comes out and it might hurt you in the long run.

For more information on King L, follow him on Twitter at @KingL.




David Doman

David Doman

Songwriter and producer David Doman chats with "On the Come Up" about why his music will make you dance.


Where are you originally from?

David Doman: I'm from Chicago, but living in LA now.

What was your first introduction to the music industry?

DD: When I was 18, I got my first couple of placements: one with Public Announcement (R. Kelly's old group) and one with Ghostface and his artist, Trife. Me and my friend drove all the way to NY from Chicago in a blizzard to record with Trife. Our rental car got hit by an 18 wheeler along the way. Shoutout to Paul Cantor for hooking that situation up.

How did you get the opportunity to work with Tyga on "Do My Dance?" How was your experience working with him?

DD: I produced three songs on Tyga's Careless World album - "Lay You Down" featuring Lil Wayne, "This Is Like" featuring Robin Thicke and "Black Crowns." My guy, Jim Lavigne, wrote and sang the hook on "Lay You Down." He also wrote the hook and bridge on "This Is Like." Cameron Forbes wrote and sang the hook on "Black Crowns." Working with Tyga is always great because I know he's gonna kill any joint he picks from me. He's easily one of my favorite rappers out and he's a super cool dude. I've been working with him for about four years now. When I sent him the beat and hook for "Do My Dance," he called me a few minutes later and told me it was a hit. It progressed quickly from there. I produced the track and wrote the hook. Thanks goes to my girl, Tina Monaco, for getting on the hook and having fun with me in the studio by doing the record. Also, thanks to her for being a great girlfriend.

What are you currently working on?

DD: I'm working with Tyga a lot on his next album and am submitting joints for all the other usual suspects out there. You can check out some of my music here.

What inspires you to create music?

DD: I'm always excited to work on music. Everyday I wake up and do the same thing, but I'm never bored or tired of it. It's been like that since I was 16. I always feel like with music there are unlimited possibilities. I can do anything I want as long as I can make it hot.

Who is your musical mentor and why?

DD: I don't really have a musical mentor. In terms of the production, I've been self-taught. When it comes to refining my sound and refining my writing, Jim Lavigne and Zach Katz have been very helpful.

What advice do you have for up-and-coming songwriters and producers?

DD: Figure out what you don't do well, then focus on improving that.

For more information on David Doman, follow him on Twitter at @davidDAdoman.